Monopolies and the Rise of Nazism in Germany: a Webinar

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The Stigler Center’s 2020 Antitrust and Competition Conference will discuss the interconnection between monopolies and politics. Our new pre-conference Monopolies and Politics Workshop Webinar Series explores some of the conference topics, including the extent to which firms can leverage their market power to capture governmental policy—a topic particularly relevant when bailouts and stimulus programs around the world are disbursing trillions of dollars of taxpayer money in an attempt to help mitigate the disastrous economic consequences of the COVID-19 epidemic.

Join the Stigler Center for a conversation with University of Michigan professor Daniel Crane and BIICL’s Senior Research Fellow Liza Lovdahl Gormsen on whether industrial cartels played a role in facilitating the rise of Nazism in Germany, the subsequent attempts to reorganize the German industrial base, and whether the historical evidence can inform antitrust reform in the 21st century. The conversation will be moderated by Stigler Center Fellow Filippo Lancieri.

Daniel Crane is the Frederick Paul Furth Sr. Professor of Law. He served as the associate dean for faculty and research from 2013 to 2016. He teaches contracts, antitrust, antitrust and intellectual property, and legislation and regulation. He previously was a professor of law at Yeshiva University’s Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law and a visiting professor at New York University School of Law and the University of Chicago Law School. Professor Crane’s work has appeared in the University of Chicago Law Review, the California Law Review, the Michigan Law Review, the Georgetown Law Journal, and the Cornell Law Review, among other journals. He is the author of several books on antitrust law, including Antitrust (Aspen, 2014), The Making of Competition Policy: Legal and Economic Sources (Oxford UP, 2013), and The Institutional Structure of Antitrust Enforcement (Oxford UP, 2011).

Liza Lovdahl Gormsen is a Senior Research Fellow in Competition Law and Director of the Competition Law Forum at the British Institute of International and Comparative Law. Liza is a Non-Governmental Advisor to the International Competition Network (ICN), appointed by the UK Competition and Markets Authority. She is a member of the ICN Unilateral Conduct Working Group and the Agency Effectiveness Working Group. Liza sits on the advisory board of the Journal of Antitrust Enforcement (OUP) edited by Professor Bill Kovacic and Professor Ariel Ezrachi. She is a Board Member of the Open Markets Institute in Washington DC. Liza is the author of A Principled Approach to Abuse of Dominance (CUP, 2010) and European State Aid and Tax Rulings (Elgar, 2019).

Filippo Lancieri (moderator) is a research fellow at the Stigler Center and a JSD Candidate at the University of Chicago Law School. His research interests include antitrust, data protection and the political economy of regulation more broadly and his JSD thesis explores the challenges of regulating digital markets. Filippo’s work has appeared in the University of Chicago Law Review, the Antitrust Law Journal and the Journal of Antitrust Enforcement, among others. Filippo also coordinated the Stigler Center Committee on Digital Platforms.

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